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History

Curriculum Intent

At CGS we hope to stimulate a lifelong love of History in our historians by asking them to engage critically with the past and the world around them; developing deep knowledge and understanding of British, European and World History from the Medieval Period to the modern day. Students will develop a sense of breadth and depth and an understanding of the second order concepts which underpin Historical thinking, whilst learning how to construct enquiry questions and how to research the answers. We want our students to value scholarship and read historical fiction and academic works throughout their time at CGS, from Year 7 to Year 13, to deepen their historical knowledge and broaden their analytical vocabularies. Students will challenge historical interpretations, construct arguments in response to historical controversies, analyse patterns and trends over time and rigorously evaluate primary sources. 

 

Key Stage 3

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9

Students will consider the overarching question, ‘Was Medieval England a divided Kingdom’ across the academic year.

 

Students will study a series of historical enquiries including:

 

  • Did one arrow change the course of History?
  • How did William keep the English people at bay?
  • Did 3 million deaths give power to the people?
  • Did the Tudors leave England divided?

 

 

 

 

 

Students will consider the overarching question,
‘Were the centuries between 1600 and 1900, a period of progress, prosperity and enlightenment?’ across the academic year.

 

Students will study a series of historical enquiries including:

  • How important was ‘fighting’ in the fight for rights?

Did Britannia ruling the waves do more harm than good?
 

 

 

 

 



 

Students will consider the overarching question ‘how should the 20th Century be remembered?’ across the academic year.

 

Students will study a series of historical enquiries including:

 

  • Did two bullets lead to twenty million deaths?
  • Were the British soldiers on the Western Front, ‘Lions led by Donkeys’?
  • Did the German people willingly support Adolf Hitler?
  • Why is the Holocaust remembered?

 

From Easter onwards students will prepare for GCSE study by studying a Unit on Medieval Crime and Punishment from 1000-1500.

 

Key Stage 3 assessment

  • Students are assessed once every half term and are given formal written feedback
  • Students are assessed across a range of skills including: evaluating the value of primary sources, explaining why events happen, evaluating historical interpretations and assessing the validity of statements

 

Key Stage 4

Edexcel History (1H10)

Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
  • Year 9 Crime and Punishment, C1000-Present

     
  • Crime and Punishment C1000-Present
  • The Reigns of King Richard and King John1189-1216
  • Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941-1991
  • The USA 1954-1975: conflict at home and abroad

 

Key Stage 4 assessment

  • Students are given written feedback a minimum of once per half-term
  • Students are assessed on a range of question stems and sit two full mock exams over the two-year course

 

Key Stage 5

AQA A Level History

Year 12 Year 13 Over the two years students consider:

Unit 1C

  • Consolidation of the Tudor Dynasty: England 1485 – 1547

Unit 2O

  • Democracy and Nazism: The Weimar Republic 1918-1933

Coursework investigation – African American Civil Rights
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





 

Unit 1C

  • England 1547-1603 Turmoil and Triumph

Unit 20

Democracy and Nazism: The Weimar Republic 1918-1933

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 









 

  • Did Richard III murder his nephews?
  • How much did Henry VIII really love Anne Boleyn?
  • Who was burnt at the stake during the reign of Mary I?
  • Why did Elizabeth execute her own cousin?
  • How accurate is the portrayal of the Tudor period in popular culture?
  • What were the consequences of the German defeat in World War One?
  • How far did Germany experience its own Roaring Twenties?
  • How did extreme ideas become popular in the 1930s?
  • How successfully did Hitler create a dictatorship?
  • How powerful were the Gestapo?
  • How far did Hitler control society?
  • How far did Hitler change the lives of ordinary Germans?
  • Who resisted Hitler and the Nazis and how effective were they?
  • To what extent was Hitler a totalitarian dictator?
  • Who was responsible for the Holocaust?
  • Why do genocides happen?
  • What was the home front like for the Germans during World War Two?
  • What are the dangers of charismatic leaders and discontented masses?

 

Key Stage 5 assessment

  • Students are given written feedback a minimum of once per half-term
  • Students are assessed on a range of question stems and sit two full mock exams over the two-year course

 

Curriculum enrichment outside of the classroom

We believe that students can develop their understanding of History greatly by visiting various historical sites or attending relevant lectures or talks.  Therefore, as a department we run a variety of residential and day trips. 

Students in Year 9 visit the World War I battlefields and currently we run a very popular trip to Berlin for Year 10 students.  This trip helps to demonstrate the impact that the Cold War has had on Europe by seeing the deep divisions that it has caused in one city.  In July 2015 and 2017, we ran very successful visits to Vietnam which not only helped to develop their understanding of the Vietnam War and the Cold War more generally, but also to experience a very different culture and society.  We also run another popular visit to New York and Washington for Year 13 students to help support their understanding of the African American civil rights course that they study. From September 2019, we will be offering a trip for Year 12 students to visit Krakow and Auschwitz.

We have also taken students to Hampton Court Palace, the Tower of London, the National Archives, the Imperial War Museum and also a series of different lectures for our sixth form students. 

Students can regularly take part in extracurricular activities organised by the department. For example we arrange for students to speak to the local University of the Third Age helping to extend our most able students and some students have also volunteered at Chesham Museum very successfully.  Some students have also entered national essay competitions and have performed very well.

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